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Asia Today ISSN 1861-4604 Sunday, January 21, 2018

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No Retaliation Following Ban on Ousted Thai PM Yingluck

Five-year political ban imposed

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BANGKOK - Former Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra's Pheu Thai Party vowed on Monday it would not retaliate a five-year political ban imposed on the ousted leader, and a party heavyweight said they could survive without the powerful family.

Following a similar path to her billionaire brother, Yingluck was last week banned from political office for five years and indicted on criminal charges over her involvement in a state rice buying scheme that cost Thailand billions of dollars.

Yingluck's supporters say the charges against her are an attempt to limit the political influence of her brother, ousted former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, and weaken his Pheu Thai Party.

Anusorn Iamsa-ard, spokesman for the Pheu Thai Party, said the decision to ban Yingluck from politics would not be a trigger for unrest.

"We will not use the decision to impeach Prime Minister Yingluck as a trigger to organize political movements, that is not our intention," Anusorn told Reuters.

Thailand remains under martial law following a May coup which the army said was necessary to restore order after months of political unrest that left nearly 30 dead. Martial law, imposed nationwide, bans all political gatherings.

The ban and the legal case against Yingluck are the latest twist in a decade of turbulent politics that have pitted Yingluck and her brother Thaksin, himself a former prime minister, against the royalist-military establishment that sees the Shinawatras as a threat and reviles their populist policies.

Both led populist governments toppled in coups and were subjected to legal action and street protests by pro-establishment activists.

Thaksin fled Thailand to avoid a 2008 jail term for corruption. He has lived abroad since, but retains a strong influence over Thai politics.

In her first public sighting since she was banned from political office, Yingluck met with Assistant U.S. Secretary of State for East Asia and the Pacific Daniel Russel in Bangkok on Monday.

Russel, who is the highest-level U.S. official to visit Thailand since the coup, also met with opposition leader Abhisit Vejjajiva and Foreign Minister General Tanasak Patimapragorn.

He will not meet Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, who as army chief led the May coup.

Thailand's military-appointed legislature last week found Yingluck guilty of negligence over her role in a state rice buying scheme that paid farmers above market prices for rice.

The same day, the attorney general's office said it would proceed with criminal charges against her for alleged corruption in the rice scheme. If found guilty by the Supreme Court, she could be jailed for up to 10 years.

She is expected to be arraigned in about a month.

Yingluck, who has defended the rice scheme, has vowed to fight the charges against her.

Chavalit Vichayasut, a former Pheu Thai Party lawmaker, said the survival of the Pheu Thai Party was not dependent on the Shinawatras.

"The work of our party does not depend on a surname or a single family. Anyone can work with us. Any surname will do as long as that person intends to work for the country," Chavalit told Reuters. "It doesn't have to be someone from the Shinawatra family."

The military government has said a general election will be held in 2016.

Thailand has been broadly split along north-south political lines since Thaksin's ouster by the military in 2006.

On one side is the Bangkok-based royalist-military establishment, which sees Thaksin, a telecommunications billionaire turned prime minister, as a threat. They accuse Thaksin, the first prime minister in Thailand's history to lead an elected government through a full term in office, of corruption and nepotism.

On the other side are his supporters in the agricultural north and northeast of Thailand, where millions of farmers voted for Yingluck in a 2011 general election.

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